Robust and powerful, the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform. His intelligence, endurance and willingness to work make him suitable as a police dog, herder, service dog, therapy dog, obedience competitor and devoted companion. An inherent protector, the Rottweiler is self-confident and responds quietly and with a wait-and-see attitude to influences in his environment. He must be medium in size and his coat is black with rust to mahogany markings.

  • Personality: Reserved with strangers and affectionate and loyal with his family.
  • Energy Level: The Rottie needs at least two solid workouts daily; he would really appreciate it if these always included you!
  • Good with Children: Better with Supervision
  • Good with other Dogs: With Supervision
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Occasional
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 24-27 inches (male), 22-25 inches (female)
  • Weight: 110-130 pounds (male), 77-110 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 8-10 years
  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

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HISTORY

The origin of the Rottweiler is not a documented record. Once this is recognized, actual history tempered by reasonable supposition indicates the likelihood he is descended from one of the drover dogs indigenous to ancient Rome.This drover dog has been described by various accredited sources as having been of the Mastiff-type-a dependable, rugged, willing worker, possessed of great intelligence, and a strong guarding instinct.

The transition from Roman herding dog to the dog we know today as the Rottweiler can be attributed to the ambitions of the Roman Emperors to conquer Europe. Very large armies were required for these expeditions and the logistics of feeding that number of men became a major consideration.
No means of refrigeration existed which meant that the meat for the soldiers had to accompany the troops “on the hoof.” The services of a dog capable of keeping the herd intact during the long march were needed
In these years (1901-07) the Rottweiler again found favor as a police dog. Several clubs were organized as dissension was most common until 1921 when it was agreed to form the Allegmeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub (ADRK). By that time, 3,400 Rottweilers had been registered by three or four clubs. Duplications and confusion ended when the ADRK published its first stud book in 1924.
Since its inception, despite the difficulties encountered during and in the aftermath of World War II, the ADRK has remained intact and through its leadership enlightened, purposeful breeding programs have been promoted both in Germany and abroad.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The ideal Rottweiler is a medium large, robust and powerful dog, black with clearly defined rust markings. His compact and substantial build denotes great strength, agility and endurance. Dogs are characteristically more massive throughout with larger frame and heavier bone than bitches. Bitches are distinctly feminine, but without weakness of substance or structure.

TRAINING AND TEMPERAMENT

No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle. Because of his original job as a super-smart and confident guardian, though, you’ll need to put in the time to train him and teach him solid social skills and harness his natural territorial instincts in a positive way. He has to know that you’re in charge, even if he is twice your size. Your hard work will be rewarded with a loyal, loving best friend.

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NUTRITION AND FEEDING

Depending on the size of your dog as an adult you are going to want to feed them a formula that will cater to their unique digestive needs through the various phases of their life. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and giant breeds.

The Rottie is a large all breed and has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

COAT AND GROOMING

Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

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ENERGY AND EXERCISE

Obedience training, preferably to include group participation, is mandatory at an early age and should be on-going throughout the life of the dog. Rottweilers love to show off and please their owners. Be certain to select an instructor who has knowledge and understanding of the breed, one who practices reasonable training methods. The personality of the Rottweiler may range from very friendly to very reserved. It is not uncommon for them to behave in a clownish manner toward family and friends. Frequently, the Rottweiler will follow its owner from room to room, preferring to keep its favorite person in view. For this reason, and many others, Rottweilers do not thrive in a kennel environment. Although a fenced yard is a must for the dog to safely experience some freedom of movement, no Rottweiler should spend all its time alone, banished from the family.

HEALTH

Like all breeds there may be some health issues. Rottweilers are subject to some genetic problems that can be passed on to any puppies they produce. Such defects include hip and elbow dysplasia (a malformation of the joint that can be crippling), several eye problems, bleeding disorders, heart defects and cancer.Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Rottweilers are healthy dogs.