The Dachshund, meaning “badger dog” in German, is a lively breed with a friendly personality and keen sense of smell. Known for their long and low bodies, they are eager hunters that excel in both above- and below-ground work.they come in three different coat varieties (Smooth, Wirehaired or Longhaired) and can be miniature or standard size.

  • Personality: Go look up the word “spunky.” We’ll wait. Did you see a photo of a Dachsie? We thought so.
  • Energy Level: Somewhat Active; A moderately active dog, but his intelligence means he gets bored easily, so it’s good to keep him busy
  • Good with Children: Better with Supervision
  • Good with other Dogs: With Supervision
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Occasional
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 8-9 inches (standard), 5-6 inches (miniature)
  • Weight: 16-32 pounds (standard), 11 pounds & under (miniature)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-16 years
  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

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HISTORY

The Dachshund can be found in historical accounts dating back to the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, when illustrations reflected badgers being hunted with dogs with elongated bodies, short legs and hound-type ears.The dogs of medieval Europe were noted to have the tracking ability of hounds and the proportions and temperament of terriers, much needed to pursue their main quarry of badgers.

Early in the 17th century, the name Dachshund (badger-dog) became the designation of a breed type with smooth and longhaired coat varieties, and in 1890 wirehairs were added as a third variety.German breeders learned early on that crossing between longhairs and either smooths or wirehairs did more harm than good, and barred such crossed from registration.

However, early on in the development of wirehairs, some crosses with smooths was permitted to establish the variety in higher numbers.

Dogs weighing 30-35 pounds were being used not only on badgers but wild boar, while smaller 16-22 pound dogs proved effective against foxes and hare.

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GENERAL APPEARANCE

Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; the skin is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. His hunting spirit, good nose, loud tongue and distinctive build make him well-suited for below-ground work and for beating the bush. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing.

FEEDING

Depending on the size of your dog as an adult you are going to want to feed them a formula that will cater to their unique digestive needs through the various phases of their life. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and giant breeds. The Dachshund is a small breed and has a lifespan of 12 to 16 years.

What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

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GROOMING

Dachsunds come in smooth, wirehair and longhaired coats with increasing coat length and grooming needs. Generally, owners can learn to do their own grooming, but many prefer the services of a professional groomer. Their nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid overgrowth and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

EXERCISE

It’s hard to stay in a bad mood with a Dachsie around—he is upbeat and curious. Dachshunds are lovable, playful companions, and an ideal pet for many homes, including those with children with appropriate supervision. They require moderate exercise, and can adapt to most living environments. Dachshunds are clever, alert, playful, and affectionate. They can also be independent little critters who have minds of their own to the point of being downright stubborn. So, like most hounds, early socialization and continued obedience training is required for a well-rounded pet.

HEALTH

Like all breeds there may be some health issues, like an overweight Dachshund is prone to many of the same problems experienced by overweight humans, such as diabetes, joint problems, decreased stamina and possibly, problems with the back. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Dachshunds are healthy dogs.

Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a Dachshund can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies. Many Dachshund Club of America members individually or collectively support health research for the breed whose mission is to help our dogs live longer, healthier lives.

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